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What Meteorology taught me about life - Teodora Grama
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What Meteorology taught me about life

Hello world!

I’m happy to report that I’ve started learning about aviation meteorology. For those of you who aren’t already pilots or haven’t studiedweather_stone this subject yet, Meteorology is referred to by some as “Satan’s subject”. This is mainly because it is one of the lengthiest subjects out of the 14 a trainee pilot has to study. And because the exam consists of answering 84 questions in 2 hours. And because there’s soooo many different things to remember and concepts to understand. And because you see all those photos of the different types of clouds, and when you go outside to try and identify some on the sky they look nothing like in the pretty photos from the books. You get the idea. 🙂

 

This new chapter in my training also happened to coincide with the launch of my super-duper website which made things in my life very interesting. Trying to understand altimetry while also trying to thank each and every person for their contribution to my dream has proven to be tricky. But it’s probably good practice for when I will be flying commercial. Multitasking for the win, right?

 

So I want to take a moment and thank everyone again for the support. I was simply overwhelmed by your positive reactions. And it couldn’t have come at a better time. I felt myself getting very frustrated with certain concepts in meteorology at the beginning of the week, slightly doubting myself, wondering if and how I will be able to wrap my head around Q-codes, types of clouds, fronts etc. By the end of the week I was able to score a nice high score on my weekly test on meteorology and I ended up with a lot of traction on my crowd funding project.

Lessons learned? No matter how grey the weather gets, the sun will always come out (pun intended), eventually. When you’re down or things don’t make sense and you feel overwhelmed it is important to remember that as long as you keep moving forward, those times will pass. All you have to do is persevere, put one foot in front of the other, wake up in the morning, show up, do the work you have to do and eventually things will get better.

Now back to aviation meteorology – if anyone out there has any tips, tricks, useful guides, ANYTHING to help me with this subject, I will be forever grateful. Looking forward to hearing from you!

 

 

Photo: flightinstructorguide.com

 
 

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